Archive for the 'nerd' Category

Glorious news

I’ve given up on designing my own site (it’s so hard to be satisfied with one’s own work). Thanks to the miracle of WordPress, kerryannwall.com is up and running. I will continue to blog here, mostly about nerdy things such as video games and hockey and all other things unrelated to my professional self, and I will eventually get game girls up and running, I swear.

As you were.

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I love a good crossword in the morning

… if by “morning” you mean “sometime after midnight.” Yes, more disturbing than my inability to fall asleep before 3 a.m. (thank you, night shift) is my ability (“willingness” is probably a better term, on second thought) to plow through a series of New York Times puzzles without stopping before going to bed. (It’s not like there’s anything on TV.)

The full extent of my crossword addiction was documented a little too well in an unfortunate opinion piece best forgotten (though after re-reading it just now, I think I overestimated the horror). It appears that my doomsday-esque prediction that crosswords were about to be eaten alive by sudoku (which most spell-checking devices — still — don’t recognize, incidentally) turned out to be wrong. In fact, it’s practically worked out in my favour now that the crossword puzzles in newspapers strewn about in subway cars are still untouched by the time I get to them. (The same can rarely be said for the sudokus, most of which are at least half-finished before being abandoned.)

There was no real point to this post, other than to distract me from crosswords and our old friend rampant speculation.

Y/N

The CBC has followed the Toronto Star into the realm of multi-layered commenting; that is to say it now allows readers to react positively or negatively to comments left on news stories.

Which sounds like a good idea until comments extending sympathy to the family of a person who has died start racking up the “disagrees.”

This very issue was the subject of a recent comment on the Star’s website speculating that someone could post a comment about children needing nurturing and encouragement and at least one person would “disagree” with it.

And finally, acceptance

After realizing that I have the domain name until 2012, I decided to get a move on.

It’s not anywhere near done (that should go without saying) but it uses words other than “coming” and “soon,” and is thus a marked improvement over what was up there yesterday.

I think it’s a spectacular font. You may disagree.

Semantics is my middle name IV: A new hope

The inauguration will take place on January 20th, 2009 in Washington D.C. on the steps of the United States Capitol. President-Elect Obama will take the oath of office, which states the following:

“I do solemnly swear that I will faithfully execute the office of the President of the United States, and will to the best of my ability, preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution of the United States.”

Vice-President Elect Biden will have already taken a similar oath.

Indulge me while I spent the next 20 seconds naively believing that a capital letter-infused entry on my unknown blog made the difference.

And now, back to reality.

Semantics is my middle name III: The Search for Spock

ARGH.

SERIOUSLY.

The inauguration will take place on January 20th, 2009 in Washington D.C. on the steps of the United States Capitol. President-Elect Obama will take the oath of office, which states the following:

“I do solemnly swear that I will faithfully execute the office of the President of the United States, and will to the best of my ability, preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution of the United States.”

Following this, the Vice-President Elect Biden will take a similar oath.

THE VICE-PRESIDENT IS SWORN IN FIRST. ALWAYS. LOOK IT UP.

</head explode>

And now, an unprovoked lecture on semantics

The approaching end to the U.S. presidential election campaign provides an excellent opportunity to remind the universe that, while the winner of the Nov. 4 contest will immediately be referred to as president-elect, the term “-elect” does not apply in every jurisdiction.

In the interim period between winning an election and taking office, a prime minister of Canada (or Great Britain or Australia) is referred to as prime minister-designate. The qualifier “-elect” refers only to individuals who have been — wait for it — elected by the — wait for it — electorate.

In the Westminster system (among others) party leaders are selected by the party and not the electorate; therefore, the leader of the party that wins the most seats is designated, not elected, prime minister. A representative directly elected by the general populace — be it a president or a member of parliament — assumes the title of title-elect in the interim period between the election and taking office.

John McCain or Barack Obama will be the next president-elect of the United States. Stephen Harper was never the prime minister-elect of Canada, though he has been the member of parliament-elect for Calgary-Southwest.

Thank you.